Aloe vera

Aloe vera Latin Name: Aloe vera
Alternate Names: Cape Aloes, Lu Hui (Chinese)
Family: LILIACEAE
Parts Used: Gelatinous substance in the stalks. Properties: Antibacterial, Anti-inflammatory, Antifungal, Biogenic Stimulator, Cholagogue, Demulcent, Emmenagogue, Emollient, Hepatic, Laxative, Purgative, Rejuvenative, Stomach Tonic, Vermifuge, Vulnerary. Internal Uses: Arthritis, Constipation, Tuberculosis, Ulcers Internal Applications: Capsules,
Juice. Topical Uses: Acne, Amenorrhea, Boils, Burns, Dandruff, Herpes, Insect Bites, Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Psoriasis, Ringworm, Scars, Sunburn, Wounds Topical Applications:
Topical applications include lotion, poultice, salve, shampoo, spray. Energetics: Cool, Bitter, Moist
Chemical Constituents: Aloins, anthraquinones, barbaloin, polysaccharides, salicylic acids.
Contraindications: Do not use internally during pregnancy. Using Aloe during nursing may have an overly laxative effect on the infant. Excessive use may aggravate hemorrhoids. High doses may cause vomiting. When used as a laxative, combine with other carminative herbs to prevent gripe.
When used topically, it is best combined with other moisturizing ingredients to prevent drying of the skin.
The common name Aloe Vera includes the species Aloe ferex and Aloe ferox, which are used interchangeably with Aloe Vera.
Aloe barbadensis is the same species as Aloe Vera.